August 30, 2005

Erectile Dysfunction

What is a Erectile Dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction, sometimes called "impotence," is the repeated inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The word "impotence" may also be used to describe other problems that interfere with sexual intercourse and reproduction, such as lack of sexual desire and problems with ejaculation or orgasm. Using the term erectile dysfunction makes it clear that those other problems are not involved.

Erectile dysfunction, or ED, can be a total inability to achieve erection, an inconsistent ability to do so, or a tendency to sustain only brief erections. These variations make defining ED and estimating its incidence difficult. Estimates range from 15 million to 30 million, depending on the definition used. According to the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), for every 1,000 men in the United States, 7.7 physician office visits were made for ED in 1985. By 1999, that rate had nearly tripled to 22.3.

In older men, ED usually has a physical cause, such as disease, injury, or side effects of drugs. Any disorder that causes injury to the nerves or impairs blood flow in the penis has the potential to cause ED. Incidence increases with age: About 5 percent of 40-year-old men and between 15 and 25 percent of 65-year-old men experience ED. But it is not an inevitable part of aging.

ED is treatable at any age, and awareness of this fact has been growing. More men have been seeking help and returning to normal sexual activity because of improved, successful treatments for ED.

How does an erection occur?

The penis contains two chambers called the corpora cavernosa, which run the length of the organ. A spongy tissue fills the chambers. The corpora cavernosa are surrounded by a membrane, called the tunica albuginea. The spongy tissue contains smooth muscles, fibrous tissues, spaces, veins, and arteries. The urethra, which is the channel for urine and ejaculate, runs along the underside of the corpora cavernosa.

Erection begins with sensory or mental stimulation, or both. Impulses from the brain and local nerves cause the muscles of the corpora cavernosa to relax, allowing blood to flow in and fill the spaces. The blood creates pressure in the corpora cavernosa, making the penis expand. The tunica albuginea helps trap the blood in the corpora cavernosa, thereby sustaining erection. When muscles in the penis contract to stop the inflow of blood and open outflow channels, erection is reversed.

What causes ED?

Since an erection requires a precise sequence of events, ED can occur when any of the events is disrupted. The sequence includes nerve impulses in the brain, spinal column, and area around the penis, and response in muscles, fibrous tissues, veins, and arteries in and near the corpora cavernosa.

Damage to nerves, arteries, smooth muscles, and fibrous tissues, often as a result of disease, is the most common cause of ED. Diseases--such as diabetes, kidney disease, chronic alcoholism, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, vascular disease, and neurologic disease--account for about 70 percent of ED cases. Between 35 and 50 percent of men with diabetes experience ED.

Also, surgery (especially radical prostate surgery for cancer) can injure nerves and arteries near the penis, causing ED. Injury to the penis, spinal cord, prostate, bladder, and pelvis can lead to ED by harming nerves, smooth muscles, arteries, and fibrous tissues of the corpora cavernosa.

Experts believe that psychological factors such as stress, anxiety, guilt, depression, low self-esteem, and fear of sexual failure cause 10 to 20 percent of ED cases. Men with a physical cause for ED frequently experience the same sort of psychological reactions (stress, anxiety, guilt, depression).

Other possible causes are smoking, which affects blood flow in veins and arteries, and hormonal abnormalities, such as not enough testosterone.

How is ED treated?

Most physicians suggest that treatments proceed from least to most invasive. Cutting back on any drugs with harmful side effects is considered first.

Drugs for treating ED can be taken orally, injected directly into the penis, or inserted into the urethra at the tip of the penis. The most effective and reliable are oral medicines.

The #1 treatment is world-known Viagra. However we do not recommend any prescription drugs on our website. Click this link for more information on how to treat Erectile Dysfunction.


August 28, 2005

Human Growth Hormones

HGH facts

Human growth hormone (HGH) is one of many endocrine hormones such as testosterone, estrogen, melatonin, and DHEA, which decline in production with age. While some of these hormones can reduce the effects of aging, only HGH and IGF-1 go far beyond the scope of the other hormones to prevent biological aging and also to reverse a broad range of symptoms associated with aging and even certain diseases of aging.

HGH is the most abundant hormone secreted by the pituitary gland. It is produced at a rate that peaks during mid twenties, when accelerated growth occurs.

The decline of growth hormone with age is directly associated with certain aging signs like wrinkling of the skin, graying of the hair, decreased energy and sexual function, increased body fat, heart disease, weak and brittle bones, and much more. The good news is that both growth hormone and IGF-1 can significantly relieve these physical signs and restore energy levels, bone strength, hair color, more youthful appearing skin, and for most people, an increased, youthful muscle mass while simultaneously reducing body fat.


The Science

Growth hormone is also called somatotropin. It's a protein hormone of 190 amino acids (building blocks of protein) that is created and secreted by in the anterior pituitary gland. It has two types of effects, both of which are highly beneficial to the vital, active human body as you'll see below.

One main type of action of the HGH is its direct effects on other kinds of cells. The growth hormone binds to its receptor on target cells, then creates some particular action. Fat cells, for example, are the target cells of HGH, so they have growth hormone receptors. Once bonded there, the growth hormone causes them to break down triglyceride and suppresses their ability to take up and accumulate circulating lipids -- in other words, fat storage is prevented!

HGH also acts to create other indirect effects in the body by causing secretion of IGF-1, an insulin-like growth factor hormone. IGF-1 is secreted from the liver and other tissues in response to growth hormone. This is the action that governs mostly growth-related effects of HGH.

Without HGH…

Because of the abilities of HGH mentioned above, you can soon see that without it, muscle tone declines, fat stubbornly sits in the body and resists metabolism, and hair, skin and nails (all composed of proteins) deteriorate. In fact, scientists now believe that HGH has a role in most healthy functions of the body, including sexual function, proper operation of stomach and bowels, liver, and all glandular systems.

Whether HGH is directly interacting with certain cells, or playing its key part in the correct function of other bodily systems, it's essential throughout the body for youthful vigor and health!

Results to expect

  • Scientific research has resulted in these amazing findings:
  • Reversed aging effects up to 20 yrs
  • Reduction of body fat and cellulite
  • Increased muscular strength
  • Increased sexual satisfaction and desire
  • Improved energy and sleep patterns
  • Improved memory capability and stabilized emotions
  • Restored skin appearance and improvement
Visit the www.yourwebdoc.com for more information.


August 10, 2005

Headache treatment research

What is a Headache?

When a person has a headache, several areas of the head can hurt, including a network of nerves that extends over the scalp and certain nerves in the face, mouth, and throat. The muscles of the head and the blood vessels found along the surface and at the base of the brain are also sensitive to pain because they contain delicate nerve fibers. The bones of the skull and tissues of the brain itself never hurt because they lack pain-sensitive nerve fibers. The ends of these pain-sensitive nerves, called nociceptors, can be stimulated by stress, muscular tension, dilated blood vessels, and others triggers of headache. Vascular headaches (migraines are a kind of vascular headache) are thought to involve abnormal function of the brain's blood vessels or vascular system; muscle contraction headaches appear to involve the tightening or tensing of facial and neck muscles; and traction and inflammatory headaches are symptoms of other disorders, ranging from brain tumor to stroke to sinus infection. Some types of headache are signals of more serious disorders: sudden, severe headache; headache associated with convulsions; headache accompanied by confusion or loss of consciousness; headache following a blow on the head; headache associated with pain in the eye or ear; persistent headache in a person who was previously headache free; recurring headache in children; headache associated with fever; headache that interferes with normal life. Physicians will obtain a full medical history and may order a blood test to screen for thyroid disease, anemia, or infections or x-rays to rule out a brain tumor or blood clots. CTs, MRIs, and EEGs may be recommended. An eye exam is usually performed to check for weakness in the eye muscle or unequal pupil size. Some scientists believe that fatigue, glaring or flickering lights, the weather, and certain foods may trigger migraine headaches.


Migraine Headache

Migraine headaches are one of the most common problems seen in the emergency department and in the doctor's office. It is a type of headache that appears to originate in the blood vessels of the head.

Migraine headaches typically last from 4-72 hours and vary in frequency from one per week to one per year. Migraine affects about 15% of the population. Three times as many women as men have migraines. Over 80% of people with migraine have other members in the family who have migraines.

Different types of migraine:

  • Common migraine accounts for 80% of migraines. There is "aura" before a common migraine. An aura is a symptom that appears before the headache. Most often an aura is a visual disturbance (seeing outlines of lights or jagged light images).
  • Classic migraine presents with an aura and is usually much more severe than common migraine.
  • Status migrainous is a persistent migraine that does not go away by itself.

Is there any treatment?

A staggering range of potential migraine medication exists. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, you may be advised to take over-the-counter analgesics, prescription medications designed to quickly relieve symptoms, or even long-term medication to prevent headaches from developing.

Go ahead and find recommended treatment, find out what is the prognosis and more. Visit the www.yourwebdoc.com for more information.